Pretension developer Super Evil Megacorp’s recent $26 million investment, along with the news of its planned partnerships with China’s Giant Interactive and Korea’s OnGamesNet, has boosted belief in mobile eSports – and particularly feature the capacity in Asia.

While Super Evil makes the push from west to east, Chinese developer Hero Entertainment is looking to head in the opposite direction with its Counter Strike-inspired Crisis Action, which it’s looking to localise and cultural for North America and Europe.

Built in Unity 3D, Crisis Action is an online multiplayer first-person shooter that’s currently available in China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Macau. With the game currently boasting 10 million daily current users, $20 million in monthly revenue, and offering eSports prizes for Taiwan totalling more than $1.5 million, what are the plans for the western launch? And how difficult is the east-west localisation procedure?

 

 

Pastures new.

We got in touch with Kola Zhou, Hero Entertainment’s Marketing Director, to get an idea of what a large endeavor localisation can be. We also discussed differing regional attitudes to mobile gaming, the future of eSports, and the challenges his team has faced so far.

Zhou begins by describing Crisis Action Hack as “a real multiplayer eSports FPS game on mobile devices,” and hopes that it can do for mobile players what traditional shooters Counter-Strike and Cross Fire did for PC gamers.

It may seem like it’s aiming for a hardcore niche, at least in mobile terms, but Zhou maintains that a substantial market for hardcore games is emerging out of the crowded mobile marketplace.

” The fierce competition makes the mobile game market more mature,” he says.

” People want more and more different and hardcore mobile games. Smartphones allow developers to create more beautiful and hard games, and gamers are also changing because of this.”

The figures certainly back this point up, too: “our users have stayed active since its launch in China two years ago and we still maintain a high DAU and pay ratio,” says Zhou.

Such are the differing attitudes of western gamers, Zhou argues that success in China has almost no bearing on performance in western territories.

” I believe that the biggest difference between western and eastern marketplace is the acceptance of culture,” he says.

” If we bring a 100 percent Eastern game to West, most people will ignore it without doing any deep research or even trying it.”